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©Copyright 2011-2015 Eric Wrobbel



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Sony 4-204UW 'Walkie Watchie' 4-inch TV. This black & white television was made in Japan in 1965. It's interesting to see how this 'walking' theme was on Sony's mind even then, leading eventually to their groundbreaking 1979 device, the Sony Walkman TPS-L2. Bottom: Panasonic TR-1030P Travelvision 1.5-inch black & white TV (1984, Japan). From 'Vintage Televisions' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/tv.htm Sharp vintage transistor television in color. Sharp 3LS36(P) 3-1/2 inch screen (1986, Japan) From 'Vintage Televisions' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/tv.htm 'Art Linkletter House Party' vintage television graphic. From 'Vintage Televisions' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/tv.htm 'To Tell the Truth' with Bud Collyer vintage television graphic. From 'Vintage Televisions' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/tv.htm Vintage collectible Seiko TV Watch TR02-01 (1982, Japan) sports a 1.2 inch black & white non-backlit LCD screen, FM stereo radio, and time, alarm, calendar, and stopwatch functions. From 'Vintage Televisions' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/tv.htm No vintage transistor television is more collectible than the Panasonic TR-005 Orbitel, usually called the 'flying saucer' TV (1971, Japan). Here is its original box. From 'Vintage Televisions' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/tv.htm

Early televisions were monsters—very large and very heavy. This is especially true of the earliest pre-World War II models that are the rarest TVs of all. You’d better have a lot of space if you’re going to collect those.

I’ve found that collecting transistor televisions is just as much fun and a lot more practical, space-wise. Transistor TVs were the first truly portable televisions and the forerunners of the portable video revolution.

Top: Sony 4-204UW “Walkie Watchie” 4-inch TV in black & white (1965, Japan); Panasonic TR-1030P Travelvision (1984, Japan). Below, the Seiko TV Watch TR02-01 (1982, Japan) sporting a 1.2 inch black & white non-backlit LCD screen.

Above is the Sharp 3LS36(P) 3-1/2 inch color set (1986, Japan) that is on the cover of my book about collecting these great little televisions.

“Art Linkletter's House Party” and “To Tell the Truth” a couple of TV shows popular at the dawn of the transistor TV era.

Shown above is the box for the very collectible Panasonic TR-005 Orbitel, usually called the “flying saucer” TV (1971, Japan).

The Philco Safari (1959, USA) was the world’s first transistor television but it was a magnified reflected-view set and a bit difficult to watch. The first direct-view transistor TV came from Sony in 1960. It was model 8-301W and it was Sony’s first television ever.

It’s shown in the video at left, which also shows the value in cross-collecting; while looking for matches for my match collection I came across this amazing little pack of Sony promo matches in (more or less) the shape of this pioneering Sony TV.