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©Copyright 2011, 2014 Eric Wrobbel



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Mid-century George Nelson designed ball clock and spike clock (starburst) by Howard Miller. Also a nice mid-century black & gold Sheffield clock from Germany c.1960s. From 'A Collection of Clocks' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/clocks.htm The mid-century George Nelson starburst (spike) clock by Howard Miller was a masterpiece of mid-century atomic jetage design. It inspired dozens of imitations-- some truly hideous like the top one you see here, some, like the bottom one, not so bad. From 'A Collection of Clocks' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/clocks.htm Vintage wind-up 'Clock of Tomorrow' by Westclox (1955, USA). In the center, a delightful clock that reminds me of a 1950s Chevrolet emblem. It's a wind-up Rhythm 'Auto Calendar Alarm Clock' (c.1958, Japan). At right is the fun Blessing wind-up alarm clock from West Germany, c.1960. From 'A Collection of Clocks' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/clocks.htm Vintage collectible Howard Miller clock. Perforated steel and wood, electric, and 11-3/8 inches across. From 'A Collection of Clocks' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/clocks.htm As huge a company as General Electric has been for many years, they've produced remarkably few stylish things. This red satellite GE Telechron electric kitchen clock is one of those things (c.1959). It's likely that the Telechron design people are responsible for the stylish GE clocks of the '50s and '60, before GE management put a stop to it. From 'A Collection of Clocks' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/clocks.htm This green plastic and chrome metal Telechron kitchen clock is from around 1940. This electric clock, marked Warren Telechron Co. (USA), predates GE's takeover of that firm. It's likely that the Telechron design people are responsible for the stylish GE clocks of the '50s and '60, before GE management put a stop to it. From 'A Collection of Clocks' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/clocks.htm

I don’t wear a watch. That’s the excuse I use for having so many clocks. Sometimes I’ll look at a clock and admire it so much I don’t even notice what time it is. Two of my favorites are the starburst, or spike, clock (c.1950s) you see at left and the ball clock below (1947). These are the real deal from Howard Miller Clock Co. (USA), design credited to George Nelson. Shown smaller and to the right are a couple of the dozens of rip-offs the Nelson clocks inspired. Most of these rip-offs, like the top one, are truly hideous; some, like the bottom one, aren’t too bad.

Historically, technology in the home has been hidden—house wiring and plumbing all out of site, electrical outlets down behind chairs, TVs and stereos hidden in a piece of traditionally-styled furniture. My mother has her video player on the floor behind a plant, for crying out loud. Clocks are the one bit of technology allowed out in plain sight—so many are stylish.

The beautiful black & gold Sheffield (above) is battery powered and from Germany c.1960s. Below it, the wind-up Clock of Tomorrow by Westclox (1955, USA). Above center is a delightful clock that reminds me of a 1950s Chevrolet emblem. It’s a wind-up Rhythm “Auto Calendar Alarm Clock” (c.1958, Japan). Above right is the fun Blessing wind-up alarm clock from West Germany, c.1960.

To the right, another Howard Miller vintage clock. It’s perforated steel and wood, electric, and 11-3/8 inches across. Below in purple and white plastic is a Goldbühl wind-up alarm clock on a pedastal base (c.1967, West Germany). It’s about four inches across.

As huge a company as General Electric has been for many years, they’ve produced remarkably few stylish things. The red satellite GE Telechron electric kitchen clock shown below right (c.1959) is one of those things.

Vintage collectible Goldbühl wind-up alarm clock on a pedastal base in purple and white plastic (c.1967, West Germany). It's about four inches across. From 'A Collection of Clocks' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/clocks.htm

The green plastic and chrome metal Telechron kitchen clock far right is from around 1940. This electric clock, marked Warren Telechron Co. (USA), predates GE’s takeover of that firm. It's likely that the Telechron design people are responsible for the stylishly- designed GE clocks of the ’50s and ’60, before GE management put a stop to it.