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©Copyright 2015 Eric Wrobbel



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Very nice mid-century candy dish/ashtray/whatever by Sascha Brastoff in Los Angeles, California. It's about 9-1/2 inches long. From 'On the Table, More!' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/table-2.htm Christmas Carol Napkins designed in the sort of over-the-top riot of Christmas themes popular in the mid 20th century. Makes me want egg nog. From 'On the Table, More!' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/table-2.htm Christmas Carol Napkins designed in the sort of over-the-top riot of Christmas themes popular in the mid twentieth century. Makes me want egg nog. From 'On the Table, More!' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/table-2.htm These aren't the little yellow & green plastic dealies you stick in each end of a hot corn cob, these are heavy, metal Air-Cooled Hacker Corn Holders. 'Just twist firmly into the corn cob ends for perfect eating pleasure.' They're from Hacker Inc., Culver City, California, USA. Stamped inside box is: 'These are Air-Cooled.' From 'On the Table, More!' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/table-2.htm Morton Salters salt shakers in a nice mid-century modern design. Probably made in the 1960s. Morton Salt, Chicago, USA. There were pepper shakers too; the one on the right, outside the package, is pepper and has a 'P' on top instead of an 'S.' From 'On the Table, More!' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/table-2.htm 'Select Shaker' is a salt & pepper shaker combined. 'An ideal gift. Can't spill, can't mix, moisture resistant.' What else could you possibly want? From 'On the Table, More!' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/table-2.htm Cheery Franciscan kidney-shaped plate or tray for candy, nuts, or whatever. On the bottom it says 'Franciscan Earthenware, Gladding, McBean & Co., Made in U.S.A. U.' From 'On the Table, More!' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/table-2.htm

Above: Morton Salters salt shakers in a nice mid-century modern design. I bought these new in a small store in the 1990s, though they have no UPC code and were probably made in the 1960s. I miss those days before stores had tight and “efficient” inventories—when you could stumble across any old thing in the back of the shelves. Morton Salt, Chicago, USA. There were pepper shakers too; the one on the right, outside the package, is pepper.

The Select Shaker is a salt & pepper shaker combined. “An ideal gift. Can’t spill, can’t mix, moisture resistant.” What else could you possibly want?

Salt & Pepper shaker collecting is one of the oldest popular collecting hobbies and still very popular. I have found that on life’s journey I tend to favor the less well-travelled roads. And so, while I can certainly see the interest in collecting these little items, I don’t have too many of them. I’m never going to pass up an especially interesting one, though!

Right: Christmas Carol Napkins designed in the sort of over-the-top riot of Christmas themes popular in the mid 20th century. Makes me want egg nog.

Above: These aren’t the little yellow & green plastic dealies you stick in each end of a hot corn cob, these are heavy, metal Air-Cooled Hacker Corn Holders. “Just twist firmly into the corn cob ends for perfect eating pleasure.” They're from Hacker Inc., Culver City, California, USA. Stamped inside box is: “These are Air-Cooled.”

Right: A cheery Franciscan kidney-shaped plate or tray for candy, nuts, or whatever. On the bottom it says “Franciscan Earthenware, Gladding, McBean & Co., Made in U.S.A. U”

At right is a very nice mid-century candy dish/ashtray/whatever by Sascha Brastoff in Los Angeles, California. It’s about 9-1/2 inches long.

The napkins box shows it contained 36 Christmas Carol Napkins, four each of 9 different illustrated carols.