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©Copyright 2011, 2014 Eric Wrobbel



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General Motors Chevrolet proposed layout for ad, Chevy II Nova, c.1965. Vintage original advertising art illustration is highly collectible, but very hard to find. Rubber cement remnants around the edges would have originally held a mat. 'Collecting art' has historically meant 'fine' art, as opposed to commercial art. From 'Advertising Illustration' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/ad-illustration-1.htm


Collecting vintage original print advertising art isn’t easy. Much of the original artwork that’s gone into print advertising over the years has been destroyed. And since the original sketches, layouts, and comprehensives (“comps”) were never intended to be seen by the public, those artworks, if they still exist at all, remain for the most part in the files and archives of the corporations for which they were created.

And that’s a pity. The few pieces I’ve managed to collect have been a delight. At left, the General Motors Chevrolet ad comprehensive shows a proposed layout for the Chevy II Nova, c.1965. The rubber cement remnants around the edges would have originally held a mat.

Below are four original paintings on illustration board for Cunard. They’re not pieced together, they’re drawn and painted directly on the board just as you see them. These originals are absolutely vibrant. Unsigned, but the boards are stamped David Garrett Jr., who may or may not have been the artist. What beautiful work!

Note the mastery of both illustration and lettering by this artist. Such skill combinations abound in the graphic arts. To say one “collects art” has historically meant the collecting of what is called “fine” art, as opposed to commercial art. That is changing.

Vintage original advertising art on illustration board for Cunard. Drawn and painted directly on the board just as you see them. Unsigned, but the boards are stamped David Garrett Jr. To say one 'collects art' has historically meant the collecting of what is called 'fine; art, as opposed to commercial art. That is changing. Cunard's. From 'Advertising Illustration' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/ad-illustration-1.htm

See more illustrations for Cunards here, and some of my own comps from my long graphics career here and here.