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©Copyright 2011-2015 Eric Wrobbel



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Valentine's Cards are a rich category in greeting card collecting. Occasionally they can be touching, but usually they're just delightfully dopey. Amateur psychologists can have a field day mulling over what was said in some of these old cards, but it's the artwork that makes them most appealing. From 'More Greeting Cards, Valentines' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/greeting-cards-2.htm

Valentine’s Cards are a rich sub-category in greeting card collecting. Occasionally they can be touching, but usually they’re just delightfully dopey. Amateur psychologists can have a field day mulling over what was said in some of these old cards, but it’s the artwork that makes them most appealing.


DETAILS from top, including publishers when shown on card: Baby you're the little number I'm looking for--Will you be my Valentine?, A-Meri-Card, c.1950; Cupid's Message, c.1930s; Valentine Greetings To My Teacher. Inside is Dear Teacher, To you I send this Valentine, With wishes true that are all for you. I like you very much I do, And I hope that you'll always like me too, c.1920s; Blow Me Down, You're a "Knockout"– a Popeye knockoff, pull his tab at top and he winks and leers, c.1940; I may be a Loaf-er but I'll go to work for you–this one unfolds to say ...if you'll be my Valentine, c.1955; You Auto Be My Valentine, c.1930s; For my Sweetheart serving his country on Valentine's Day, GB, c.1944; I'd "Travel" to the moon for you Valentine!, CAE, c.1950s; Dear Valentine, Here's a great big heart for you, A.C. Co., 1941; Yoo Hoo! Won't you be my Valentine?, c.1930; Try my Valentine Sundae, flavored with tulips and bliss–Served with two spoons and loving care–All for the price of a kiss, To My Valentine. This one opens up to reveal he is taking "Love Tonic" alone with his dog looking on. Really. c.1940s; To My Valentine (inside: Valentine Greetings, Words can't express what I think of you), c.1940s; Valentine Greetings you handsome thing!, Hope it won't make you conceited–To learn you've got me Overheated!, Gibson, c.1950.

Many collectors seek the fancy cards like “Cupid's Message” above. Some are embossed, have paper lace, and, like this one, fold up into 3D scenes. They’re great, to be sure, but the cards of the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s appeal to me most.