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©Copyright 2011-2015 Eric Wrobbel



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Vintage garage collectibles: Cornell Tube Repair Kit (Akron, 1940s), Hold Tight! tube patch kit (Better Monkey Grip Co., Dallas, c.1955), Brasso (Hull & London, England, 1960s), Pure Gold grease (Pep Boys, Philadelphia, c.1960), Brasso c.1960, Cadillac Fabric Cleaner with chlorothene (General Motors, Detroit, c.1959), Cadie Auto Cloth, c.1960. From 'Garage/Utility Collectibles' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/garage.htm
This vintage collectible Hotpoint Appliances sign is lit from within. From 'Garage/Utility Collectibles' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/garage.htm The sort of 'roadside collectibles' kids bring home: Car and truck emblems, and an old street sign from White Oak Avenue in the west San Fernando Valley. From 'Garage/Utility Collectibles' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/garage.htm Vintage!-- Kurly Kate stainless steel sponge, c.1940s, Fire-Alert, c.1955, red Fedtro FA-1 fire alarm, c.1960, Smart Household (paper) Towels (Smart & Final Iris, c.1950), Las-stik Wax-Treated Cloth, 1970s, Kelly's Silver Dressing for shoes, c.1940, Johnson's Prepared-Liquid Wax, 1936, New Instant Joy for Dishes (Proctor & Gamble, c.1958). From 'Garage/Utility Collectibles' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/garage.htm
The dedicated collector will even display things in the garage--usually things associated with auto maintenance or housekeeping. Things you wouldn't really display in the house. But the perfect 'garage collectible' is a car! Like this 1967 Mercedes-Benz 250 SL convertible, known especially for its concave-shaped, removable 'pagoda' hardtop. From 'Garage/Utility Collectibles' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/garage.htm

What do you do with ‘garage’ collectibles? You know, the things usually associated with auto maintenance or housekeeping. Things you wouldn’t really display in the house anywhere.

Well, the obvious places are also the perfect choices! The garage, utility room, and junk drawer need collectibles too, don’t they? I keep mine right among all the ‘real’ things that I actually use. Seeing them there brightens any chore. 

This stylish Hotpoint Appliances sign is lit from within. To the right, the sort of ‘roadside collectibles’ kids bring home.

 Those two interesting gizmos below center are battery-operated fire alarms. They look good and maybe afforded some peace of mind, but in reality they were essentially bicycle horns with a heat-sensitive switch on the bottom; they had to be virtually engulfed in flames before they’d sound an alarm!

Of course the perfect collectible in any garage is the collectible car. This one’s been in mine since 1973. It’s a 1967 Mercedes-Benz 250 SL convertible, known especially for its concave-shaped, removable “pagoda” hardtop. My daily driver for many years, this faithful little car now enjoys a life of leisure taking me to Baskin-Robbins on the occasional summer night.

Admittedly, one collectible car does not a car collection make. This, however, is by design. Cars are very demanding and I simply have too much else to do. As a young man I had many cars (being from suburban Detroit it was—and still is—in my blood). I learned then that without sufficient time and resources to devote to their care, a car collection is just a junkyard.

Top: Cornell Tube Repair Kit (Akron, Ohio, USA, 1940s), Hold Tight! tube patch kit (Better Monkey Grip Co., Dallas, Texas, USA, c.1955), Brasso “By Appointment to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, suppliers of metal polish, Reckitt & Sons Ltd.” (Hull & London, England, 1960s), Pure Gold universal joint and wheel bearing grease (Pep Boys: Manny, Moe & Jack, Philadelphia, USA, c.1960), Brasso in the rectangular can (England, c.1960), Cadillac Fabric Cleaner with chlorothene (General Motors, Detroit, USA, c.1959), Cadie Auto Cloth (USA, c.1960).

Kurly Kate stainless steel sponge “for dairies, canneries, meat packers” (Chicago, USA, c.1940s), bullet-shaped Fire-Alert (Alert Industries, New York, USA, c.1955), red Fedtro FA-1 fire alarm (Japan, c.1960), Smart Household (paper) Towels (Smart & Final Iris, USA, c.1950), Las-stik Wax-Treated Car and Home Cloth PC-15 (Ohio, USA, 1970s), Kelly's Silver Dressing for shoes and slippers “Kelly's shines in polished society” (USA, c.1940), Johnson's Prepared-Liquid Wax glass bottle (Wisconsin, USA, 1936), New Instant Joy for Dishes “Mildest Ever” (Proctor & Gamble, USA, c.1958). The glass Joy bottle is, I suppose, one of my “kitchen collectibles,” but that page, like the kitchen itself, is full.