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©Copyright 2011-2015 Eric Wrobbel



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Record album covers: Crass commercialization of '60s youth culture in the packaged hippies dubbed 'The Love Generation.' Ever wonder where the values and hopes of the 1960s went? This should give you a clue. Groovy Summertime, Imperial LP-9351, Art Direction: Woody Woodward, Design: Andrew C. Rodriguez, Photography: Ivan Nagy, Fashions by Zeidler & Zeidler & The Flare. From the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/records-2.htm
Record collecting: Album covers were not created as 'art,' they were created to sell records--to sit on the shelf and vibrate until you picked them up. This James Brown cover does that very well, even if it looks somewhat cheesy. I contend it has a terrific charm that would probably be lost if it were 'better.' James Brown and His Famous Flames, King 909. From 'More Records' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections


Record collecting: Album covers were not created as 'art,' they were created to sell records--to sit on the shelf and vibrate until you picked them up. This Velvetones cover does that very well, even if it looks somewhat cheesy. It has a terrific charm that would probably be lost if it were 'better.' Grimes Records LP 103, photo by Art Leon, Johnson-Leon Studios, Hollywood. From the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/records-2.htm



Record collecting, album covers: This dime store record attempts to cash in on the '60s youth culture its makers probably loathed. Kiddie Au Go-Go / Nursery Rhymes with the Teen Dance Beat of Today! / The Mod Moppets, Happy Time Records (Pickwick International) HT-1037. From 'More Records' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/records-2.htm

Part of the fun of collecting is comparing and classifying the objects collected—best of its type, worst of its type, etc.

With album covers, I’ve found the best and the worst to be the most interesting to me. I don’t mean to judge these things and I don’t mean “worst” in a disparaging way. If an object stands out to me as being amateurish or cheesy, well, at least it stands out! In a world where conforming, mind-numbing mediocrity reigns supreme, that is saying something.

And it should be remembered that these album covers were not created as “art,” they were created to sell records—to sit on the shelf and vibrate until you picked them up. The James Brown and the Velvetones covers shown here do that extremely well, even if they look somewhat cheesy. I contend they have a terrific charm that would probably be lost if they were “better.”

See also my other records page for more album covers, ones that are collectible for very different reasons than those shown here.

Last, and probably least, check out the crass commercialization of the ’60s youth culture shown here in Kiddie Au Go-Go and in the packaged hippies dubbed “The Love Generation.” Ever wonder where the values and grand hopes of the 1960s went? These two covers should give you a clue.


DETAILS from top left: The Love Generation / including Groovy Summertime, Imperial LP-9351, Art Direction: Woody Woodward, Design: Andrew C. Rodriguez, Photography: Ivan Nagy, Fashions by Zeidler & Zeidler Ltd. & The Flare; James Brown and His Famous Flames / Please, Please, Please, King 909; The Velvetones, Grimes Records LP 103, photo by Art Leon, Johnson-Leon Studios, Hollywood, California; Kiddie Au Go-Go / Nursery Rhymes with the Teen Dance Beat of Today! / The Mod Moppets, Happy Time Records (Pickwick International) HT-1037.