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The stunning Toshiba ZS-7210A (Japan, c.1965) is a transceiver, a 'walkie talkie' of exceptional quality and design. From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm Things called 'walkie-talkies' span a range from the 'string phone' (essentially the old tin can telephone) through the wired communicators (essentially telephones) to full-fledged wireless transceivers. As you might guess, the blue & red 'Remco Space Commander' here is a string phones. From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm Things called 'walkie-talkies' span a range from the 'string phone' (essentially the old tin can telephone) through the wired communicators (essentially telephones) to full-fledged wireless transceivers. As you might guess, the 'Micro-Fone' here is a string phones. From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm Things called 'walkie-talkies' span a range from the 'string phone' through the wired communicators (essentially telephones) to full-fledged wireless transceivers. This 'Remco Electronic,' is wired but doesn't use batteries or any other source of power, making it even more primitive than Alexander Graham Bell's original telephone patent. From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm These 'Remco Space Commander' walkie-talkies are 'string phones' (like the old do-it-yourself tin can telephone). As a kid in the '50s, you were likelier to walk on the moon than hear anything out of them. The taut string between units--required for them to work at all--is somehow missing from the picture on the box. From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm They wouldn't lie to a kid, would they? According to the box, these Dick Tracy Walkie Talkies are wireless and 'good up to 1/2 mile.' But alas, inside the sealed box--discovered AFTER you bought them--is the truth: a coil of wire. Yes, these walkie talkies have to be connected with wire. And we're only giving you twenty feet of it, too! From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm The Remco 'Electronic' Walkie Talkies from 1951 were shown on the box as wireless transceivers. That they weren't. The box boasted that they used no batteries, but that made them even more primitive than Alexander Graham Bell's original telephone patent. Oh well, kids like to shout, don't they? From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm Collectible '70s retro walkie talkie transceiver Vanity Fair VF-1081. From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm Vintage collectible Heathkit Jr. Walkie Talkie transceiver, made of the thinnest plastic I've seen on a product since shrink wrap. It was sold as a kit (USA, 1962). From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm Vintage Sony Walkie Talkie CB-200W transceivers. Sleek and serious. From 'Walkie Talkies' at the web's largest private collection of antiques & collectibles: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/collections/walkie-talkies.htm

Things called “walkie-talkies” span a range from the “string phone” (essentially the old tin can telephone) through the wired communicators (essentially telephones) to the full-fledged wireless transceivers. You can probably guess which is which in these pictures! Yes, the Micro-Fone to the right and the blue & red Remco Space Commander below are string phones.

To the right is another Remco product, the Remco Electronic, which is a wired walkie-talkie but doesn’t use batteries or any other source of power—making it even more primitive than Alexander Graham Bell’s original telephone patent.

Far left: a real transceiver, the stunning Toshiba ZS-7210A (Japan, c.1965).

Below, some of the kid-magnet boxes these toys came in.

I find collecting walkie-talkies so fun and interesting that I did a book on them called Toy Walkie Talkies. I highly recommend it!

Below left is the Vanity Fair VF-1981 (1980, Korea). In the middle, the Heathkit Jr., made of the thinnest plastic I’ve seen on a product since shrink wrap. It was sold as a kit (USA, 1962).

Right: The sleek, serious Sony CB-200W (Japan, 1970).