-------


©Copyright 2008, 2015 Eric Wrobbel



Share |

'Bessemer Yacht Club' logo used on stationery for an imaginary yacht club in the middle of dry, harborless Van Nuys, California. From an assortment of fake stationery hand-drawn and used facetiously by artist Eric Wrobbel for correspondence during this period. More here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm 'Nick & Nora Charles' logo for stationery hand-drawn and used as a gag by artist Eric Wrobbel for correspondence in the early '80s. More 'Fake Stationery' here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm 'Ned's Sanatorium' logo used on stationery for an imaginary sanatorium used by members of the imaginary Bessemer Yacht Club in Van Nuys, California. From an assortment of fake, droll stationery hand-drawn and used by artist Eric Wrobbel for correspondence during this period. More here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm 'Bessemer Yacht Club' logo used on stationery for an imaginary yacht club in the middle of dry, harborless Van Nuys, California. From an assortment of fake, droll stationery hand-drawn and used facetiously by artist Eric Wrobbel for correspondence during this period. More here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm 'California' logo used on stationery for personal correspondence in the early 1980s. It's one of the less droll examples of the fake stationery hand-drawn by artist Eric Wrobbel during this period. More here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm 'Anglo-Saxon Hotel' logo used on stationery for an imaginary hotel such as would have been seen in the 1980s in little ads in the back of The New Yorker magaine. From an assortment of fake, droll stationery hand-drawn and used by artist Eric Wrobbel for correspondence during this period. More here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm 'Pearl of the Pacific' logo used on stationery for an imaginary luxury liner ship such as would have been seen in the 1980s in little ads in the back of The New Yorker magaine. From an assortment of fake, droll stationery hand-drawn and used by artist Eric Wrobbel for correspondence during this period. More here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm 'Trout City Fish Market' logo used on stationery for an imaginary shop/restaurant. The name mocks a trend in the 1970s and '80s to name new businesses 'Something' City. From an assortment of fake, droll stationery hand-drawn and used by artist Eric Wrobbel for correspondence during this period. More here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm 'The San Fernando Valley' logo for stationery hand-drawn by artist Eric Wrobbel for correspondence in the early '80s. 'The Valley' was at that time the last place a serious artist would admit to calling home, and so Wrobbel thought the stationery droll. More here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm In the 1980s 'Surf City' was just a Jan & Dean oldie. Thinking it a great name for a town, artist Eric Wrobbel created this logo for use on personal correspondence in his droll line of facetious stationery, here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm 'Camp Pacoima--Bilingual retreat, Federally funded.' This droll logo used on personal stationery by artist Eric Wrobbel in the early 1980s. The 'art' apes a particular graffiti style seen all over the eastern and central San Fernando Valley at the time. From an assortment of facetious stationery used by the artist for correspondence during this period. More here: http://www.ericwrobbel.com/art/fakestationery.htm
Perhaps it is some personal character flaw of mine, but I’ve always enjoyed sending letters on fake stationery. Not forged stationery, mind you, but hand-drawn letterheads from goofy entities—mostly made up. In probably what is a genuine character flaw, I use things like this to sort out people with my sort of sense of humor from all the rest. If the letterhead brings a favorable response, great. If it brings a solemn “what is this?,” I know I’m going to have compatibility issues with this person. I think we all do this, one way or the other, putting ourselves out there in a particular way and gauging the response.

What: Concept, design, illustration
For: various personal stationery letterheads
Client: self, early 1980s